current-label

nutrition labels get a makeover

Recently, the FDA announced proposed changes to the nutrition labels that appear on food packaging. It was announced as part of the Let’s Move campaign and billed as a public health initiative. These changes are the first since the labels were introduced in the 1990s.


I’ve always thought the most ineffective/deceptive part of the nutrition facts label was the number of servings, and by the same token, the calorie count. Did you know in a pint of Ben & Jerry’s there are 4 servings? I mean, who measures out a half cup of ice cream? Not many people. And in a 20-ounce bottle of soda, 2 servings? Often the bags of chips you get at sandwich shops to accompany your meals are two servings. 

So the new labels aim to address this issue, among others – the primary goal being to allow consumers to more quickly choose what’s healthy. (Ironically, the nutrition facts label is a separate thing from ingredient lists, which the FDA also regulates. For someone to truly quickly choose what’s healthy, they need to know a little something about the ingredients too, but that’s a separate issue.)

The proposed new labels will do a few things, but the first big change is the layout. Calories are much more prominent, as are the servings per container. Companies will be required to make serving sizes more realistic instead of artificially making them smaller so that calories per serving appear smaller. Ice cream servings will be one cup, and 20-ounce sodas will be one serving. If a package is truly two servings but is assumed that it could be eaten in one serving (possibly like snack bags), it will require a dual label. Basically the labels will reflect what someone does eat instead of what he/she should eat.

The proposed labels will also require a new line under the carb category that says “Added Sugars.” This is really important, since we know for sure that Americans, and children in particular, consume way too much added sugar. (Watch Jamie Oliver’s TEDTalk where he shows you with an actual mound of sugar what kids consume in a year. Crazy.)

Potassium and Vitamin D will also be added, as public health officials find both to be deficient in the typical American diet. Potassium contributes to lowered blood pressure and Vitamin D contributes to bone health. Vitamins A and C will be voluntary listings.

Calories from fat will be removed, since science has shown that the type of fat is more important than the amount

A 90-day comment period will be held, and if no changes are made, it will take a few years to implement the changes. Industry will push back and want to make revisions – that’s almost inevitable.

But regardless of what happens, the general consumer needs to be more educated about what these items even mean, and how to combine that knowledge with facts about the ingredient list to determine what is a “healthy” product. Honestly, the more you have to do math and detective work to figure out if something is healthy, the less likely that it is. The proposed new label will not fix all of America’s dietary problems, but it’s a great start!

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/14616864866608368193 Face

    Now if only you could get people to read them…

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/07868575410528001444 Cheralee Stover

    I think this is a great start, but wouldn’t it be more eye opening to make the packaging for drive through food show the same info? Or post the total number of calories for a pint of Ben and Jerry. “For every break up this pint is used for, you will consume a kajillion calories.” 😉